MSR Employees’ Favorite Camp Recipes

Camp meals vary wildly from person to person. Some are ultralight backpackers who eat cold instant refried beans every night without complaint (not joking). Others, whether car camping or out in the backcountry, want the whole shebang, from a starter salad to a glass of wine and dessert. These five recipes from MSR employees lie mostly in the middle (though some definitely lean toward the backcountry feast side of the scale). We’re a pretty outdoorsy bunch here at MSR, and we’ve perfected our camp recipes over years of adventures. MSR also makes pretty spectacular backpacking and camp stoves, if we do say so ourselves, and each employee has a favorite for cooking up their camp recipes. Check out this deep dive into our stoves, from Polar explorer Eric Larsen. A…

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Best Gifts for the Outdoors Under 1 Pound

Gearheads can be hard to shop for (speaking for the many gearheads at MSR, including myself). But generally, if you choose a gear gift that’s light and high-quality you’ll hit a home run. We wanted to make your holiday shopping as easy as possible this year, so we’ve compiled a list of all our favorite gear that’s under a pound and sure to delight even the most discerning of outdoorspeople. E-Bivy™ Minimum Weight: 6 oz. Price: $199.95 The E-Bivy is some people’s emergency plan and other people’s shelter of choice—we’re here for both. Tiny enough to throw in any pack and weather-resistant for protection when you need it, the E-Bivy is a great gift for everyone who spends time in the backcountry. Thru-Hiker 70 Wing Minimum Weight: 12 oz. Price: $189.95…

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MSR Folding Utensils – Behind the Gear

Even eating utensils require quality engineering. Product Manager Steve Grind answers a few questions about the design and performance of MSR’s Folding Utensils, designed for maximum packability and food-to-mouth efficiency. We know what’s important when you’re camping. What is the advantage of a folding spoon, fork or spork? Folding utensils are popular because they collapse into a much smaller configuration for packing, and often provide an overall longer utensil that is more suitable for use with pouch-cook meals. And utensil length is important if you’re a freeze-dried food aficionado, assuming you’d prefer not to spend your after-dinner time cleaning stroganoff from your knuckles. Some people prefer rigid utensils for their simplicity and ease of cleaning—and there are some good, long, single-piece utensils available. I tend to take folding utensils on…

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