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Snowshoe Bag

Great for worry-free packing and storage, this convenient, zippered bag is built from extra tough fabric to protect your snowshoes and the things you pack them in.

$39.95
In stock
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Great for worry-free packing and storage, this convenient, zippered bag is built from extra tough fabric to protect your snowshoes and the things you pack them in.
  • Easy-Carry: Hand and shoulder straps offer multiple carrying options.
  • Ventilated: Mesh panel and drain grommet maximize ventilation for long-term storage.
  • Pole Compatible: External hook and loop tabs carry one pair of snowshoe poles for added convenience.

  • Accommodates: One pair of snowshoes up to 25 in. (64 cm) plus internal sleeve for a pair of Modular Flotation Tails.
Size No
Color Black
Style No
Color Family Black
UPC Code 040818056516
The primary purposes of a snowshoe are to provide flotation and traction. Since all MSR® snowshoes deliver exceptional traction, your next consideration is flotation, and this is where size comes into play.

Once you’ve decided on a snowshoe, assess your weight, including all the gear and clothing you’ll be wearing the majority of the time you snowshoe. If you only go on a couple of overnights a year, don’t include that 50-pound pack—just your fully clothed weight, plus a daypack and water. Then consider the snow conditions you’re likely to travel in most often—deep, untracked powder, or groomed trails and established snowshoe routes. Are you at a high altitude or very far north where snow generally falls deep and light and a larger snowshoe is in order, or are you at lower elevations or in a coastal range where snow has high moisture content and generally consolidates rapidly, making a smaller snowshoe your best choice?

The idea is to find the smallest possible snowshoe that matches your needs in most–not all–situations so you can maximize your agility and efficiency. Now, with Modular Flotation tails available across all MSR adult snowshoes, we’ve made that easier than ever. Should you find yourself on the cusp between sizes, always go with the smaller one and then simply add tails for added flotation as needed.
Both of these snowshoes offer outstanding traction, aggressive bindings, ergonomic deck shapes, Modular Flotation and excellent durability. However, when it’s all said and done, the all-aluminum Lightning snowshoes offer it all with a bit less weight. You’ll also find that because the 360° Traction frames of the Lightning snowshoes is vertical all the way to the edge, it offers slightly better traction on traverses. And don’t forget that the composite, Unibody decks of our Evo shoes are built from an incredibly tough, injection-molded plastic, giving them a slight advantage in durability in the course of normal use.
Dry your snowshoes after each use. Then store them with bottoms together to keep the sharp under-bits form damaging other gear.
Inadequate traction is horribly inefficient, with every misstep wasting precious energy. That’s why we provide the industry’s best traction, regardless of what shoe you purchase—from kid’s snowshoes, to our most aggressive shoes. The result is a far more enjoyable experience with the increased efficiency of solid, no-slip footing and the confidence to go anywhere.
First and foremost, you should seek out bindings that suit your needs. Do you prioritize comfort or security? The best bindings do both. It’s also important to understand that regardless of what a tag says a binding does, it can’t do it if it’s frozen. Be leery of excessive use of nylon webbing and cordage–both absorb water and can leave your bindings rendered useless when frozen. Look for simplicity (fewer parts and potential for things to break) and light weight, and try them on in the store with the same footwear you’ll use in the field. Unless you have an exceptionally small or large foot, a good binding will be able to adapt to a range of footwear to keep your options open.
All MSR snowshoe components are proudly made in Seattle, USA, and the employees of Cascade Designs build every snowshoe we make. Shoes found in North America and Japan are entirely built in the USA, while those found in Europe have some final assembly done in our Cork, Ireland facility.

What is California Proposition 65?
Proposition 65 is the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act passed by voters in the State of California in 1986. The act was created to inform people about possible exposure to chemicals known by the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects and/or other reproductive harm.

What are the requirements of Proposition 65?
Proposition 65 requires that the Governor of California maintain and publish a list of harmful chemicals. The list is updated annually and includes chemicals that can be found in solvents, drugs, dyes, food additives, by-products of certain processes, pesticides, and tobacco products.

A chemical is listed if it has been classified as a reproductive toxicant or carcinogen by an "authoritative" organization on the subject. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the National Toxicology Program, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer are considered authoritative for carcinogens. For reproductive toxicants, the authorities are the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and International Agency for Research on Cancer. Chemicals will also be listed if they are required to be labeled or identified as a carcinogen or as a reproductive toxicant by an agency of the state or federal government.

Why has MSR placed a Proposition 65 label on its products?
Any company with 10 or more employees operating or selling products within the State of California must comply with the requirements of Proposition 65. To comply, businesses are: (1) prohibited from knowingly discharging listed chemicals into sources of drinking water; and (2) required to provide a "clear and reasonable" warning before knowingly and intentionally exposing anyone to a listed chemical.

A Proposition 65 warning means that the business has evaluated the exposure and has concluded that it exceeds the "no significant risk level," or that the business is providing a warning based on the presence of a "listed" chemical without actually evaluating the exposure.

MSR is providing a warning based on our knowledge about the presence of one or more listed chemicals without attempting to evaluate the level of exposure. While using an MSR product, the exposure to a "listed" chemical may be well within the "no significant risk" range, but out of caution, we have placed the Proposition 65 warning labels on our products.

Are consumers who are using an MSR product with a Proposition 65 warning at risk?
The California government states: "The fact that a product bears a Proposition 65 warning does not mean by itself that the product is unsafe." The government also explained, "You could think of Proposition 65 more as a 'right to know' law than a pure product safety law."

A Proposition 65 warning means that the product contains one or more listed chemicals. By law, a warning is required unless the business proves that the exposure to the chemical poses "no significant risk." The "no significant risk" level for carcinogens is defined as the level which is calculated to result in not more than one excess case of cancer in 100,000 individuals exposed over a 70-year lifetime. Therefore, if you are exposed to the chemical in question at this level every day for 70 years, theoretically, it will increase your chances of getting cancer by no more than 1 case in 100,000 individuals so exposed.

The "no significant risk" level for reproductive toxicants is defined as the level of exposure which, even if multiplied by 1,000, will not produce birth defects or other reproductive harm. Therefore, the level of exposure is below the "no observable effect level," divided by 1,000. (The "no observable effect level" is the highest dose level which has not been associated with observable reproductive harm in humans or test animals.) For further information about California's Proposition 65, please visit http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/background/p65plain.html

Backcountry Dog Etiquette

During a recent ski tour to Table Mountain in the Mount Baker backcountry, three friends and I rescued a lost dog. It was an hour before sunset on a cold December afternoon and there were no other people in sight when we spotted the shorthaired mutt searching for her owners. As the shivering, disoriented animal limped higher up the mountain, away from the parking lot, it became clear that something was wrong. One member of our group, Kirsten, attracted the timid dog with an avocado sandwich. Kirsten phoned the number we found on the dog’s identification tags and was able to get in touch with the owner, who was waiting in the cozy Heather Meadows lodge, about a 30-minute hike from our location. The dog was not able to run…

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Introducing Access™ Winter Backcountry Tents

For backcountry skiers, splitboarders and snowshoers looking to spend comfortable nights in the winter mountains.

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Together We Can Defend Our Public Lands

At MSR we strongly believe that it is our American right to enjoy, protect and preserve our public lands. As a Seattle-based company and manufacturer, the public lands in our backyard serve as a testing and development ground for our products and a recreation area for our employees and customers from across the political spectrum. MSR has joined other outdoor industry leaders in signing this open letter urging our elected officials to keep public lands public. Please read on to add your voice and help share the message. To our elected officials and those who value America’s great outdoors: This open letter expresses the view of more than 100 leaders of large and small businesses in the outdoor industry, which contributes more than $650 billion annually to the U.S. economy,…

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Subaru owner
January 2, 2015
No, I would not recommend this to a friend
Okay start, but not refined enough
Bought three of these for my family. The Pro's: quality construction, pole holder, inner pocket for flotation tails, carry handle, carry strap, ventilated case, and holds 22" or 25" snowshoes. The Con's (i.e., areas for improvement): tails easily fall out of sleeve (Velcro or other way to keep the tails secure in the sleeve would be welcome), there is no inner pocket for extra straps or a repair kit. Other: no "extras" such as attached whistle, no water bottle holder, no pouch for extra pair of gloves. I would likely recommend this product to a friend if the above improvements are made. Current product is a good start, but needs additional refinement.
kmbr
December 12, 2014
Yes, I would recommend this to a friend
Updated MSR Snowshoe bag
Great bag that has served me well for over 3 years, and like the other reviews before, this bag is a great bag for keeping your snowshoes and gear organized all in one place. The pre Winter 2014 model is very robust it fits my Lightening 25's and my tails. The major thing that is lacking is the depth of the bag, it limits you to fit your snowshoes stacked one on top of another versus the crampon sides facing each other, but this keeps it nice and compact. It would be nice if they had a small mesh or zippered pocket on the inside of the lid for spare parts like trekking pole baskets or other nick-nacks (chapstick, energy bar, etc). There is a newer version of this bag that I just bought, again they only fit up to 25's, they now have 2 pockets for the tails in the base of the bag with both openings of the pockets facing the center of the bag, my first thoughts were that the tails would fall out when carrying it in an upright position, but they don't. I guess many others felt the same way about adding an extra zippered pocket, which is now designed on the outside of the lid. The bag material its self seems a little less robust that the earlier version, and the velcro straps for the trekking poles have been replaced with bungy chord, not a big fan of that, if your poles don't compress to the length of the bag what ends up happening is you have to put the handles through the top bungy and then fit the tips in the lower bungy and now the handles stick out much higher than the bag, versus the precious bag your poles can be be center.
Rosebear95843
November 11, 2014
Yes, I would recommend this to a friend
An organizational must!
Got this fabulous bag at the time I purchased my MSR snow shoes, snow shoe tails, gaiters and poles as part of a Christmas gift to myself. Everything packs up nicely, and is kept together so you can just get up and go for a day of snowshoeing or for storage during the summer. When I snowshoe with a group and carpool up in the Sierras from Sacramento, I am one of the few people who has a bag for her snow shoe gear, so finding my equipment is fast and easy among several pairs of snowshoes and sets of poles and a few back packs in the rear of someone's car.

Free shipping on all orders over $100

Available for U.S. addresses only.

We know that in the backcountry, reliable gear is critical. That’s why MSR gear has always been engineered to the highest quality standards and rigorously tested before it reaches you. If your MSR gear is in need of repair, please contact our Seattle Repair Shop at 1-800-531-9531 and our technicians will work to find you a solution as quickly as possible. A majority of the time, MSR products can be repaired. If you are experiencing an issue with your product that you feel should be covered under the MSR Limited Warranty, please visit msrgear.com/warranty for more info.