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Ultraleichtes Zwei-Personen-Zelt für Rucksacktouren Hubba Hubba NX 2

Unser meistverkauftes, preisgekröntes Zwei-Personen-Zelt. Learn more.

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Description
Tech Specs
Videos
FAQs & Documents
Warranty & Repairs
Dieses Zelt ist ideal für Rucksackwanderungen, bei denen es auf Platz und Gewicht ankommt. Das MSR Hubba Hubba für zwei Personen ist sowohl beim Transport als auch bei der Nutzung leicht und effizient. Von der optimierten, symmetrischen Geometrie und dem gerade verlaufenden Boden, der möglichst viel Platz bietet, bis zu den integrierten und verstellbaren Verankerungsschlaufen, die für einen schnellen Zeltaufbau sorgen. Dieses Zelt definiert den Begriff leichte Wohnlichkeit neu. Egal, ob Sie in den Höhen der Alpen klettern oder in den Rocky Mountains unterwegs sind: Das freistehende, Drei-Jahreszeiten-Zelt Hubba Hubba ist Ihnen ein treuer und zuverlässiger Begleiter.
  • Ultraleicht: Das Mindestgewicht beträgt 1,54 kg. Das Zelt kann auch in zwei Fast & Light® Optionen mit 970 g aufgebaut werden.
  • Maximaler Platz: Viel Bewegungsfreiheit im Kopf- und Ellenbogenbereich im gesamten Zelt, zwei große Eingangsbereiche seitlich bieten Platz für die Ausrüstung.
  • Wohnlich: Zwei große StayDry?-Türen mit Regenrinne, anpassbares Überzelt mit Belüftung.
  • Einfacher Aufbau, einfach zu packen: Integriertes Hub-Gestänge-System mit farblich gekennzeichneten Clips, ultrakompakter Kompressionspacksack.
Liste mit allen Merkmalen anzeigen
  • Optimierte, symmetrische Geometrie und gerade verlaufender Boden
  • Große, bequeme, D-förmige StayDry Tür und großer Eingangsbereich.
  • Reißverschluss seitlich
  • Überzelt-Kickständer mit Belüftungsklappen
  • Anpassbares Überzelt (aufrollbarer Eingangsbereich und Sternenfenster)
  • Hellgraues Überzelt (neutrales Hellgrau)
  • Anpassbare, integrierte Verankerungsschlaufen
  • Leichte, reflektierende Abspannleinen
  • Strapazierfähiges, hochfestes Nylongewebe
  • Verstärkte Endloskurznähte und doppelte Kappnähte
  • Mit Durashield beschichtetes Überzelt und Wannenboden
  • Ultrakompakter Kompressionspacksack mit Ziehgriff.
  • Die freihstehende Fast & Light® Option kann entweder mit oder ohne Überzelt aufgebaut werden. Ohne Überzelt kann es noch platzsparender verstaut werden. Das Zelt kann entweder mit oder ohne Zeltunterlage (separat erhältlich) aufgebaut werden.
  • Die geöffnete Tür fällt zum Eingangsbereich so, dass sie nicht im Weg ist.
  • Die große Tür des StayDry hat eine integrierte Regenrinne und versiegelte Nähte für zuverlässigen Wetterschutz.
  • Ein Kickständer mit Belüftungsklappen im Überzelt ist an das Netzgewebefenster angepasst. Dadurch wird Frischluft ins Innere geführt und gleichzeitig Kondensierung minimiert.
  • Ein ultrakompakter Kompressionspacksack mit seitlichen Öffnungen lässt sich mit Kompressionsriemen auch nach innen falten, um besser im Rucksack verstaut zu werden.
Award Image
Farbe
Web - Use Images As Swatches?
Frame Weight (Standard)
Frame Weight (Metric)
Capacity
Fast & Light® Weight w/ F&L Body (Standard)
Fast & Light® Weight w/ F&L Body (Metric)
Minimum Weight (Standard)
Minimum Weight (Metric)
Packaged Weight (Standard)
Packaged Weight (Metric)
Floor Area (Standard)
Floor Area (Metric)
Vestibule Area (Standard)
Vestibule Area (Metric)
Archived Product
Tent Volume (Standard)
Tent Volume (Metric)
Number of Poles
Interior Peak Height (Standard)
Interior Peak Height (Metric)
Packed Size (Standard)
Packed Size (Metric)
Number of Doors
Freestanding
Rainfly Fabric
Canopy Fabric
Mesh Type
Floor Fabric
Country of Origin

MSR Tents: How to prevent tent condensation

Documents and Instructions

"D" stands for Denier. It's a numbering system for fibers, filaments and yarns, in which the lower numbers are lighter/finer and the higher numbers heavier/coarser. "T" stands for Thread Count – specifically the number of warp and fill threads in a square inch. The lower numbers represent a loosely woven fabric and the higher number a tightly woven fabric. These two numbers together help indicate the strength and feel of a piece of fabric.
The 7-point design has a "flat" and a "pointed" end. For all configurations, the "pointed end" should always be used as the highest supported point. The opposite "flat edge," which consists of three points, can be stretched tightly and attached to a shelter, car rack, or even the pole-supported vestibule of a tent to form a protected area. Try placing the poles at different points, using no poles at all or adding more poles to create new living spaces. (Paddles and sticks work well in the cord storage pockets, too.) Experiment and be creative!
We recommend that you use an MSR footprint (sold separately) underneath your tent. Customized to fit each specific model, it will not only keep your tent floor clean and dry, but it will also protect it from excessive abrasion, prolonging the life of the tent. In addition, some of our tents can be set up with just the footprint and fly, creating an incredibly light, minimalist alternative to a full tent.
Never pack or store your tent if it is wet, damp or dirty. Although we use the best polyurethane waterproofing available, prolonged exposure to moisture causes hydrolysis which, in turn, causes the waterproof layer to break down, becoming soft, sticky and no longer waterproof. Storing a wet tent for as little as 24 hours in warm weather is also likely to start the process of mildew forming on the fabric. Mildew will cause your tent to stain, smell and will also lead to the premature breakdown of the waterproof coating. Mildew and moisture damage are not covered under the Limited Warranty.

For long-term storage, keep your tent in a dry and cool area, out of direct sunlight. Store it outside of its stuff sack, as you would a sleeping bag, in a breathable, over-sized cotton or mesh duffel for protection. On the cheap, an old pillowcase is ideal.
A tent's lifespan is directly connected to the amount you use it. A tent's biggest enemy is UV radiation (just like your skin). A tent that lives in extreme conditions at high altitude, such as Everest Base Camp, may only last a few months, while a well taken care of tent, used occasionally under normal conditions, can last for many years.
At MSR, we voluntarily follow ASTM International F 1934-98 standards around these two tent industry terms. In accordance with this standard, packaged weight includes the total weight of the packaged contents off the shelf. Minimum weight, by comparison, refers to the combined weight of the tent body, rainfly (if applicable) and tent poles, but not any of the other items that may appear in the package, such as tent stakes, guy cords, stuff sack, etc.

Many MSR backpacking tents can be pitched using only the rainfly, poles and footprint, and in our tent specs we call this non-industry standard setup option our Fast & Light weight.

To learn more about packaged weight vs. minimum, and the manufacturing processes that can affect them, check out our blog post on the topic.
Guying out your tent will provide more stability in windy or extreme conditions while also maximizing ventilation. To guy out your tent, run cord from the tent's guy point through the tensioner. Pass the cord around the stake and back through the tensioner, keeping the curved side of the tensioner toward the stake. Tie a knot at the end of the cord. To tighten cord, pull the tensioner up along the cord and release.
One of the easiest ways to damage your tent is by not drying it as quickly as possible after it gets wet. Storing a wet tent for as little as 24 hours in warm weather is likely to start the process of mildew formation. Mildew can permanently damage the waterproof coatings by causing them to separate from the fabric, but mild to severe staining is more common. Mildew stains are permanent. They cannot be removed without potential harm to the fabric coatings and are not covered by warranty. Even when your tent appears to be dry after use, it is always best to assure it is completely dry before storing. Hang it outside or pile it loosely in your house for a few days, turning it inside and out to assure it has dried everywhere. Never machine dry your tent as the heat can melt the fabric.
Cleaning your tent is not necessary unless it has an offensive odor or becomes heavily soiled. If heavily soiled, the pressure from a regular garden hose will remove most loose dirt. For more severe cleaning, set up your tent and hand wash it with warm water, a sponge and mild, non-detergent soap. Do not use dishwashing liquid, detergent, bleach, pre-soaking solutions, or spot removers. Rinse well. Dry your tent by pitching it or line-drying it. Never dry clean, machine- wash or machine-dry your tent. Any of these methods can remove all the waterproof coatings from the tent.
For an MSR tent, waterproof means that all external fabric has been coated with our exceptional polyurethane coatings and the seams have been factory-taped, making that area of the tent impermeable to water. "mm" refers to millimeters and is paired with a number to represent a standardized measurement of how waterproof a coating is. For instance, a 1500mm coating will withstand a 1500mm (5') column of water for more than one minute before a single drop might appear through the fabric. That's strong enough to prevent rain from leaking into a tent in a hurricane-force storm.
Condensation is the build-up of moisture inside your tent due to differences between the inside and outside temperatures. There are three main sources:
  • Weather Conditions: High humidity, low temperatures, and rainy conditions create the most condensation.
  • People: We produce about 1 - 2 pints of moisture per night through breathing and skin evaporation.
  • Wet Environment: Wet ground or wet gear stored inside the tent.
While no tent design can eliminate condensation, the key to reducing it is ventilation. Cooler, drier air has to flow into your tent and warm, moist air must escape. We have designed a variety of ways to do this.

To start, the tent body and ceiling are made of breathable and mesh fabrics. This allows moisture to escape the interior of your tent. However, it must also be able to escape the waterproof fly, and every MSR rainfly has a peak vent that provides protection from the outside, while still allowing essential, free-flowing fresh air to move through your tent. You can also leave a door open in good weather, or take advantage of the double sliders on the doors to vent from the top where warm and moist air tends to accumulate. Make sure to leave at least two vents open if possible, allowing any breeze to provide cross-flow ventilation for maximum circulation. Guying out your rainfly will also increase ventilation in hot or humid conditions.

Video: What causes condensation in a tent
You can do minor repairs in the field using one of several alternatives. We offer waterproof, self-adhesive patches (sold separately) for all of the fabrics and mesh on your tent. Seam sealants are also a good alternative for small holes, or use duct tape for minor, temporary field repairs. If you use duct tape, be sure to remove it as soon as you are through with your trip. The adhesive will eventually eat away at the fabric and you will end up needing a larger patch. We recommend carrying at least one of these as a precaution. If you have a large tear, our Product Service Center can also fix your tent after you return from your trip.
If a tent pole breaks, you can make a temporary splint with the pole repair sleeve. Slide the repair sleeve over the broken section and tape or wedge in place with a stick to hold it secure.

We know that in the backcountry, reliable gear is critical. That’s why MSR gear has always been engineered to the highest quality standards and rigorously tested before it reaches you. If you need to repair a piece of MSR equipment, please contact our Seattle Repair Shop at 1-800-245-2992 and our technicians will strive to fix it or replace it as quickly as possible. Most MSR products can be repaired. If you experience a manufacturing defect, we offer a Limited Warranty on all products. Please visit msrgear.com/warranty for more info.

Description
Dieses Zelt ist ideal für Rucksackwanderungen, bei denen es auf Platz und Gewicht ankommt. Das MSR Hubba Hubba für zwei Personen ist sowohl beim Transport als auch bei der Nutzung leicht und effizient. Von der optimierten, symmetrischen Geometrie und dem gerade verlaufenden Boden, der möglichst viel Platz bietet, bis zu den integrierten und verstellbaren Verankerungsschlaufen, die für einen schnellen Zeltaufbau sorgen. Dieses Zelt definiert den Begriff leichte Wohnlichkeit neu. Egal, ob Sie in den Höhen der Alpen klettern oder in den Rocky Mountains unterwegs sind: Das freistehende, Drei-Jahreszeiten-Zelt Hubba Hubba ist Ihnen ein treuer und zuverlässiger Begleiter.
  • Ultraleicht: Das Mindestgewicht beträgt 1,54 kg. Das Zelt kann auch in zwei Fast & Light® Optionen mit 970 g aufgebaut werden.
  • Maximaler Platz: Viel Bewegungsfreiheit im Kopf- und Ellenbogenbereich im gesamten Zelt, zwei große Eingangsbereiche seitlich bieten Platz für die Ausrüstung.
  • Wohnlich: Zwei große StayDry?-Türen mit Regenrinne, anpassbares Überzelt mit Belüftung.
  • Einfacher Aufbau, einfach zu packen: Integriertes Hub-Gestänge-System mit farblich gekennzeichneten Clips, ultrakompakter Kompressionspacksack.
Liste mit allen Merkmalen anzeigen
  • Optimierte, symmetrische Geometrie und gerade verlaufender Boden
  • Große, bequeme, D-förmige StayDry Tür und großer Eingangsbereich.
  • Reißverschluss seitlich
  • Überzelt-Kickständer mit Belüftungsklappen
  • Anpassbares Überzelt (aufrollbarer Eingangsbereich und Sternenfenster)
  • Hellgraues Überzelt (neutrales Hellgrau)
  • Anpassbare, integrierte Verankerungsschlaufen
  • Leichte, reflektierende Abspannleinen
  • Strapazierfähiges, hochfestes Nylongewebe
  • Verstärkte Endloskurznähte und doppelte Kappnähte
  • Mit Durashield beschichtetes Überzelt und Wannenboden
  • Ultrakompakter Kompressionspacksack mit Ziehgriff.
  • Die freihstehende Fast & Light® Option kann entweder mit oder ohne Überzelt aufgebaut werden. Ohne Überzelt kann es noch platzsparender verstaut werden. Das Zelt kann entweder mit oder ohne Zeltunterlage (separat erhältlich) aufgebaut werden.
  • Die geöffnete Tür fällt zum Eingangsbereich so, dass sie nicht im Weg ist.
  • Die große Tür des StayDry hat eine integrierte Regenrinne und versiegelte Nähte für zuverlässigen Wetterschutz.
  • Ein Kickständer mit Belüftungsklappen im Überzelt ist an das Netzgewebefenster angepasst. Dadurch wird Frischluft ins Innere geführt und gleichzeitig Kondensierung minimiert.
  • Ein ultrakompakter Kompressionspacksack mit seitlichen Öffnungen lässt sich mit Kompressionsriemen auch nach innen falten, um besser im Rucksack verstaut zu werden.
Award Image
Made in China
Tech Specs
Farbe
Web - Use Images As Swatches?
Frame Weight (Standard)
Frame Weight (Metric)
Capacity
Fast & Light® Weight w/ F&L Body (Standard)
Fast & Light® Weight w/ F&L Body (Metric)
Minimum Weight (Standard)
Minimum Weight (Metric)
Packaged Weight (Standard)
Packaged Weight (Metric)
Floor Area (Standard)
Floor Area (Metric)
Vestibule Area (Standard)
Vestibule Area (Metric)
Archived Product
Tent Volume (Standard)
Tent Volume (Metric)
Number of Poles
Interior Peak Height (Standard)
Interior Peak Height (Metric)
Packed Size (Standard)
Packed Size (Metric)
Number of Doors
Freestanding
Rainfly Fabric
Canopy Fabric
Mesh Type
Floor Fabric
Country of Origin
Videos

MSR Tents: How to prevent tent condensation

FAQs & Documents

Documents and Instructions

"D" stands for Denier. It's a numbering system for fibers, filaments and yarns, in which the lower numbers are lighter/finer and the higher numbers heavier/coarser. "T" stands for Thread Count – specifically the number of warp and fill threads in a square inch. The lower numbers represent a loosely woven fabric and the higher number a tightly woven fabric. These two numbers together help indicate the strength and feel of a piece of fabric.
The 7-point design has a "flat" and a "pointed" end. For all configurations, the "pointed end" should always be used as the highest supported point. The opposite "flat edge," which consists of three points, can be stretched tightly and attached to a shelter, car rack, or even the pole-supported vestibule of a tent to form a protected area. Try placing the poles at different points, using no poles at all or adding more poles to create new living spaces. (Paddles and sticks work well in the cord storage pockets, too.) Experiment and be creative!
We recommend that you use an MSR footprint (sold separately) underneath your tent. Customized to fit each specific model, it will not only keep your tent floor clean and dry, but it will also protect it from excessive abrasion, prolonging the life of the tent. In addition, some of our tents can be set up with just the footprint and fly, creating an incredibly light, minimalist alternative to a full tent.
Never pack or store your tent if it is wet, damp or dirty. Although we use the best polyurethane waterproofing available, prolonged exposure to moisture causes hydrolysis which, in turn, causes the waterproof layer to break down, becoming soft, sticky and no longer waterproof. Storing a wet tent for as little as 24 hours in warm weather is also likely to start the process of mildew forming on the fabric. Mildew will cause your tent to stain, smell and will also lead to the premature breakdown of the waterproof coating. Mildew and moisture damage are not covered under the Limited Warranty.

For long-term storage, keep your tent in a dry and cool area, out of direct sunlight. Store it outside of its stuff sack, as you would a sleeping bag, in a breathable, over-sized cotton or mesh duffel for protection. On the cheap, an old pillowcase is ideal.
A tent's lifespan is directly connected to the amount you use it. A tent's biggest enemy is UV radiation (just like your skin). A tent that lives in extreme conditions at high altitude, such as Everest Base Camp, may only last a few months, while a well taken care of tent, used occasionally under normal conditions, can last for many years.
At MSR, we voluntarily follow ASTM International F 1934-98 standards around these two tent industry terms. In accordance with this standard, packaged weight includes the total weight of the packaged contents off the shelf. Minimum weight, by comparison, refers to the combined weight of the tent body, rainfly (if applicable) and tent poles, but not any of the other items that may appear in the package, such as tent stakes, guy cords, stuff sack, etc.

Many MSR backpacking tents can be pitched using only the rainfly, poles and footprint, and in our tent specs we call this non-industry standard setup option our Fast & Light weight.

To learn more about packaged weight vs. minimum, and the manufacturing processes that can affect them, check out our blog post on the topic.
Guying out your tent will provide more stability in windy or extreme conditions while also maximizing ventilation. To guy out your tent, run cord from the tent's guy point through the tensioner. Pass the cord around the stake and back through the tensioner, keeping the curved side of the tensioner toward the stake. Tie a knot at the end of the cord. To tighten cord, pull the tensioner up along the cord and release.
One of the easiest ways to damage your tent is by not drying it as quickly as possible after it gets wet. Storing a wet tent for as little as 24 hours in warm weather is likely to start the process of mildew formation. Mildew can permanently damage the waterproof coatings by causing them to separate from the fabric, but mild to severe staining is more common. Mildew stains are permanent. They cannot be removed without potential harm to the fabric coatings and are not covered by warranty. Even when your tent appears to be dry after use, it is always best to assure it is completely dry before storing. Hang it outside or pile it loosely in your house for a few days, turning it inside and out to assure it has dried everywhere. Never machine dry your tent as the heat can melt the fabric.
Cleaning your tent is not necessary unless it has an offensive odor or becomes heavily soiled. If heavily soiled, the pressure from a regular garden hose will remove most loose dirt. For more severe cleaning, set up your tent and hand wash it with warm water, a sponge and mild, non-detergent soap. Do not use dishwashing liquid, detergent, bleach, pre-soaking solutions, or spot removers. Rinse well. Dry your tent by pitching it or line-drying it. Never dry clean, machine- wash or machine-dry your tent. Any of these methods can remove all the waterproof coatings from the tent.
For an MSR tent, waterproof means that all external fabric has been coated with our exceptional polyurethane coatings and the seams have been factory-taped, making that area of the tent impermeable to water. "mm" refers to millimeters and is paired with a number to represent a standardized measurement of how waterproof a coating is. For instance, a 1500mm coating will withstand a 1500mm (5') column of water for more than one minute before a single drop might appear through the fabric. That's strong enough to prevent rain from leaking into a tent in a hurricane-force storm.
Condensation is the build-up of moisture inside your tent due to differences between the inside and outside temperatures. There are three main sources:
  • Weather Conditions: High humidity, low temperatures, and rainy conditions create the most condensation.
  • People: We produce about 1 - 2 pints of moisture per night through breathing and skin evaporation.
  • Wet Environment: Wet ground or wet gear stored inside the tent.
While no tent design can eliminate condensation, the key to reducing it is ventilation. Cooler, drier air has to flow into your tent and warm, moist air must escape. We have designed a variety of ways to do this.

To start, the tent body and ceiling are made of breathable and mesh fabrics. This allows moisture to escape the interior of your tent. However, it must also be able to escape the waterproof fly, and every MSR rainfly has a peak vent that provides protection from the outside, while still allowing essential, free-flowing fresh air to move through your tent. You can also leave a door open in good weather, or take advantage of the double sliders on the doors to vent from the top where warm and moist air tends to accumulate. Make sure to leave at least two vents open if possible, allowing any breeze to provide cross-flow ventilation for maximum circulation. Guying out your rainfly will also increase ventilation in hot or humid conditions.

Video: What causes condensation in a tent
You can do minor repairs in the field using one of several alternatives. We offer waterproof, self-adhesive patches (sold separately) for all of the fabrics and mesh on your tent. Seam sealants are also a good alternative for small holes, or use duct tape for minor, temporary field repairs. If you use duct tape, be sure to remove it as soon as you are through with your trip. The adhesive will eventually eat away at the fabric and you will end up needing a larger patch. We recommend carrying at least one of these as a precaution. If you have a large tear, our Product Service Center can also fix your tent after you return from your trip.
If a tent pole breaks, you can make a temporary splint with the pole repair sleeve. Slide the repair sleeve over the broken section and tape or wedge in place with a stick to hold it secure.
Warranty & Repairs

Returns & Warranty Info

We know that in the backcountry, reliable gear is critical. That’s why MSR gear has always been engineered to the highest quality standards and rigorously tested before it reaches you. If you need to repair a piece of MSR equipment, please contact our Seattle Repair Shop at 1-800-245-2992 and our technicians will strive to fix it or replace it as quickly as possible. Most MSR products can be repaired. If you experience a manufacturing defect, we offer a Limited Warranty on all products. Please visit msrgear.com/warranty for more info.

size chart